This Mortal Coil: Gene-Hacking, Gripping Action and (a little) Gore

This Mortal Coil by Emily Suvada is a refreshing new dystopia/sci-fi/post-apocalyptic story that grabbed me from the start until the very end, and left me gasping with the many twists and turns.

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This Mortal Coil by Emily Suvada33876440

Catarina Agatta is a hacker. She can cripple mainframes and crash through firewalls, but that’s not what makes her special. In Cat’s world, people are implanted with technology to recode their DNA, allowing them to change their bodies in any way they want. And Cat happens to be a gene-hacking genius.

That’s no surprise, since Cat’s father is Dr. Lachlan Agatta, a legendary geneticist who may be the last hope for defeating a plague that has brought humanity to the brink of extinction. But during the outbreak, Lachlan was kidnapped by a shadowy organization called Cartaxus, leaving Cat to survive the last two years on her own.

When a Cartaxus soldier, Cole, arrives with news that her father has been killed, Cat’s instincts tell her it’s just another Cartaxus lie. But Cole also brings a message: before Lachlan died, he managed to create a vaccine, and Cole needs Cat’s help to release it and save the human race.

Now Cat must decide who she can trust: The soldier with secrets of his own? The father who made her promise to hide from Cartaxus at all costs? In a world where nature itself can be rewritten, how much can she even trust herself?

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What immediately grabbed me from the start and impressed me was the writing style. From the very first line, it intrigued me. The writing is vibrant and colorful, and I absolutely loved it. If a book can grab me with the writing, it says a lot, and this book could.

The premise itself is not that original, actually, it is not at all original at the first glance. It is about a girl surviving in a post-apocalyptic world, with zombie-like humans, corrupt corporations, and a plague. But despite its unoriginal premise, the story is completely new and different. It brings many new aspects and interesting things to the table.

Her words are clipped and sharp. She speaks the way a rife fires. She is steel and glass and blood fused into a blade.

I loved the gene-hacking and coding aspect to the story. There are many scientific descriptions about how it works, but it wasn’t overwhelming. What Emily Suvada did really well is to describe scientific things in a simple but realistic way. The world felt so much more realistic due to the scientific aspect of the story. It also made me think about how gene-hacking (which basically means you manipulate your genes) would work in the real world and it felt like the things that happened there, would also be able to happen here.

The word was here before I was born, and it will be keep spinning after I am dead. The universe is continuous; I am the anomaly. I am the thread that begins and ends, the flame that sputters out. A chance collection of proteins and molecules that perpetuates itself, bound by the electric fire of my mind.

The characters were all really great and multi-faceted. I loved Catarine and Cole and I thought they made a great duo. Cat was smart and determined and wanted to do the right thing. She was also funny at times, which I really liked. The only character that I didn’t really like was Dax (who is Cat’s ex), but the sole reason for that was that he kept calling Cat “Princess”.

The one thing that annoyed me mildly was the romantic storyline, which I thought was a little unnecessary. But that’s probably just my romance-aversion talking.

‘How are you feeling?’
‘I feel like… I feel like I got shot in the back.’
‘That’s a common side effect of getting shot in the back.’

The book is mildly disturbing, has many plot twists you never see coming, and is brilliantly woven into a story that you won’t forget easily. I am giving it 4.5 stars because it was gripping and had amazing writing. I really loved it! I am not giving it 5 stars because the romance was a little unnecessary and there was no diversity in it.

8 thoughts on “This Mortal Coil: Gene-Hacking, Gripping Action and (a little) Gore

    1. Yay! I’m happy you liked it! I really can’t wait for the book to come out because I just NEED to know what that pigeon poem is all about! And I can’t wait for the sequel of course!

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