Mini Reviews | The Witch Doesn’t Burn in This One and Sneaking Out

I am really late with both of these reviews because the books are already out. So I’m doing two mini reviews! Both books couldn’t be more different, The Witch Doesn’t Burn in This One by Amanda Lovelace is poetry and Sneaking out is YA murder/mystery.

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Review | Nothing But Sky: A Badass Female Character in Historic Fiction

I am normally not a huge fan of historic fiction (in the sense that I rarely pick it up) but this book really took me by surprise!


Nothing but Sky by Amy Trueblood

Grace Laffe


rty only feels alive when she’s dangling 500 feet above ground. As a post-World War I wing walker, Grace is determined to get to the World Aviation Expo, proving her team’s worth against flashier competitors and earning a coveted Hollywood contract.

No one’s ever questioned Grace’s ambition until Henry Patton, a mechanic with plenty of scars from the battlefield, joins her barnstorming team. With each new death-defying trick, Henry pushes Grace to consider her reasons for being a daredevil. Annoyed with Henry’s constant interference, and her growing attraction to him, Grace continues to test the powers of the sky.

After one of her risky maneuvers saves a pilot’s life, a Hollywood studio offers Grace a chance to perform at the Expo. She jumps at the opportunity to secure her future. But when a stunt goes wrong, Grace must decide whether Henry, and her life, are worth risking for one final trick.


The story follows Grace, who is a wingwalker, which means she does tricks on airplane wings while it’s in the air. I was immediately impressed by her daring but also by her character. She is, in many ways, ahead of her time. WWI just ended and wingwalking is not exactly the most common job for a young woman to have. But despite everything, she still gets on that plane, because she wants to and she loves it. She’s strong, independent and fierce and I loved that about her.

“Men loved to use their height to try and intimidate me. It happened at shows across the nation. Whether they wanted an autograph, a photo, or just a chance to show their distaste for the life I’d chosen, it was a tactic that never worked. I battled rain, wind, and thunderstorms at 500 feet; men didn’t frighten me.”

Grace and her crew are trying to earn money participate in a competition, and I loved how the author showed this struggle within the team, but also showed the external struggles and the changing situation in the world. I loved the setting and how the author described it. I could dream away in cloudless blue skies, stuffy hangars, and cigar-smoke-filled bars and I loved it! It makes me want to pick up historical fiction more often!

“This life we’ve chosen is full of risk. Every day we go up into those clouds knowing there’s a chance we may not come down alive.”

A couple of other things I loved were the romance, which wasn’t take a huge part of the story but added to it really nicely and it was so adorable, and the plot twists: these were so well-done, I really didn’t see them coming.

“May your skies always be cloudless and blue, Grace.”

Overall, I’m giving this book 4.5 stars because it was just so much fun to read! I loved reading about Grace and her crew and all that they were going through. The writing was great and the story kept me really interested in the story at all times! I definitely recommend this book if you are a bit hesitant about picking up historic fiction (like me) but want to try to read more! And also for everyone who already loves historic fiction, of course!

Review | The Exact Opposite of Okay: A New Favourite

I’ve probably put off writing this review for way too long. But how am I supposed to accurately tell you how amazing this book is? I have no words.


35817737The Exact Opposite Of Okay by Laura Steven

Izzy O’Neill is an aspiring comic, an impoverished orphan, and a Slut Extraordinaire. Or at least, that’s what the malicious website flying round the school says. Izzy can try all she wants to laugh it off – after all, her sex life, her terms – but when pictures emerge of her doing the dirty with a politician’s son, her life suddenly becomes the centre of a national scandal. Izzy’s never been ashamed of herself before, and she’s not going to start now. But keeping her head up will take everything she has…

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Review | Down and Across: Crosswords & Coming of Age (BLOG TOUR)

Welcome to my first ever blog tour! This is also why I am posting a review on a Wednesday, but anyway here’s my review for Down and Across by Arvin Ahmadi.


35134061Scott Ferdowsi has a track record of quitting. Writing the Great American Novel? Three chapters. His summer internship? One week. His best friends know exactly what they want to do with the rest of their lives, but Scott can hardly commit to a breakfast cereal, let alone a passion.

With college applications looming, Scott’s parents pressure him to get serious and settle on a career path like engineering or medicine. Desperate for help, he sneaks off to Washington, DC, to seek guidance from a famous professor who specializes in grit, the psychology of success.

He never expects an adventure to unfold out of what was supposed to be a one-day visit. But that’s what Scott gets when he meets Fiora Buchanan, a ballsy college student whose life ambition is to write crossword puzzles. When the bicycle she lends him gets Scott into a high-speed chase, he knows he’s in for the ride of his life. Soon, Scott finds himself sneaking into bars, attempting to pick up girls at the National Zoo, and even giving the crossword thing a try–all while opening his eyes to fundamental truths about who he is and who he wants to be.

Arvin Ahmadi was born and raised in Northern Virginia. He graduated from Columbia University and lives in Brooklyn. Down and Across is his first novel.

Afbeeldingsresultaat voor arvin ahmadi

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Review | More Than We Can Tell: A Beautiful, Emotional Contemporary about Family and Abuse

More Than We Can Tell by Brigid Kemmerer is an emotional story about two people who, though they have their own problems, find each other.


34236194Rev Fletcher is battling the demons of his past. But with loving adoptive parents by his side, he’s managed to keep them at bay…until he gets a letter from his abusive father and the trauma of his childhood comes hurtling back.

Emma Blue spends her time perfecting the computer game she built from scratch, rather than facing her parents’ crumbling marriage. She can solve any problem with the right code, but when an online troll’s harassment escalates, she’s truly afraid.

When Rev and Emma meet, they both long to lift the burden of their secrets and bond instantly over their shared turmoil. But when their situations turn dangerous, their trust in each other will be tested in ways they never expected. This must-read story will once again have readers falling for Brigid Kemmerer’s emotional storytelling.

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Review | At The Edge of The Universe: A Little Weird, Very Queer and Very Good

At The Edge of the Universe is the second book by Shaun David Hutchinson I’ve read and has proved again how underrated his books are.


28763240Tommy and Ozzie have been best friends since second grade, and boyfriends since eighth. They spent countless days dreaming of escaping their small town—and then Tommy vanished.

More accurately, he ceased to exist, erased from the minds and memories of everyone who knew him. Everyone except Ozzie.

Ozzie doesn’t know how to navigate life without Tommy, and soon suspects that something else is going on: that the universe is shrinking.

When Ozzie is paired up with new student Calvin on a physics project, he begins to wonder if Calvin could somehow be involved. But the more time they spend together, the harder it is for him to deny the feelings developing between them, even if he still loves Tommy.

But Ozzie knows there isn’t much time left to find Tommy–that once the door closes, it can’t be opened again. And he’s determined to keep it open as long as possible.

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Double Review: Warcross & Strange The Dreamer

I’ve read a couple of really good books lately and these are two of them! I’ve read Warcross by Marie Lu together with Ilsen, and Strange the Dreamer by Laini Taylor was actually the first book I started in 2018.


29385546For the millions who log in every day, Warcross isn’t just a game—it’s a way of life. The obsession started ten years ago and its fan base now spans the globe, some eager to escape from reality and others hoping to make a profit. Struggling to make ends meet, teenage hacker Emika Chen works as a bounty hunter, tracking down players who bet on the game illegally. But the bounty hunting world is a competitive one, and survival has not been easy. Needing to make some quick cash, Emika takes a risk and hacks into the opening game of the international Warcross Championships—only to accidentally glitch herself into the action and become an overnight sensation.

Convinced she’s going to be arrested, Emika is shocked when instead she gets a call from the game’s creator, the elusive young billionaire Hideo Tanaka, with an irresistible offer. He needs a spy on the inside of this year’s tournament in order to uncover a security problem . . . and he wants Emika for the job. With no time to lose, Emika’s whisked off to Tokyo and thrust into a world of fame and fortune that she’s only dreamed of. But soon her investigation uncovers a sinister plot, with major consequences for the entire Warcross empire.

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