Review | It Only Happens in the Movies: The Queen of Contemporary Slays Again

It Only Happens in the Movies is the new book by Holly Bourne, which is one of my favourite contemporary authors and this book did not disappoint at all!




Audrey is over romance. Since her parents’ relationship imploded her mother’s been catatonic, so she takes a cinema job to get out of the house. But there she meets wannabe film-maker Harry. Nobody expects Audrey and Harry to fall in love as hard and fast as they do. But that doesn’t mean things are easy. Because real love isn’t like the movies…

The greatest love story ever told doesn’t feature kissing in the snow or racing to airports. It features pain and confusion and hope and wonder and a ban on cheesy clichés. Oh, and zombies… YA star Holly Bourne tackles real love in this hugely funny and poignant novel.


There are a few things you can expect from a Holly Bourne book: feminism, realistic and amazing characters, great friendships and a bit of romance. And this book had it all, and on top of that movies, so many movies! Throughout the book many romantic tropes are mentioned and discussed, and if you watch romantic movies sometimes, I am sure you will see them with different eyes next time you watch one.

“The only love affair I needed to invest in right now was one with myself. Spend some time with me. Figuring out myself and why I picked the relationships I did. I was holding out my heart to me. Because I’d realised I was the only person who could give me a happily-ever-after.”

Audrey, the main character, doesn’t want romance anymore and thinks romantic movies are unrealistic and dangerous. I loved reading about a character that for once doesn’t want romance, because that’s quite difficult to find in YA contemporaries. I thought Audrey was so realistic. She is intelligent, values feminism and how women are portrayed in movies, and she doesn’t let her opinions be silenced. She also isn’t perfect: she’s mean at times, she does some questionable things, but all of that just adds to my love for Holly Bourne’s writing: her characters are almost real. And I wish dearly I could be friends with them.

This book is so important! Not just because of the messages in feminism, but also because it doesn’t stay clear of things that are usually omitted in YA fiction: about getting your period, about love, about losing your virginity, about sex, etc. Beside this, all the characters are amazing and realistic, there are plenty of funny moments, and it doesn’t omit the uglier parts of life. And love. Despite Audrey not wanting love, there is a romantic storyline. And it is amazingly written: not too cheesy, not too cliché. Holly Bourne takes a trope and turns it into something entirely new.

“I AM like other girls, Harry. Don’t misinterpret my hatred of romance as some kooky, laid-back, manic pixie NONSENSE. I am DAMAGED. I am not CUTE. I am emotionally-fucking-traumatised right now, okay? I am screaming on the inside. I am too angry and messed up to contain all the stuff girls spend every day containing. That’s why I seem different. That is NOT sexy.”

I am giving this book five stars because once again Holly Bourne has shown what an amazing author she is. I like YA contemporary and I read quite a bit of it, but Holly Bourne is by far my favourite YA contemporary author. This book is realistic, important, fun, feminist and above all relatable. 

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Review: The Nowhere Girls | A must-read for every girl (and boy)

The Nowhere Girls by Amy Reed was a book I didn’t have very high expectations of. I expected to like it, because I like feminist books, but it was surprising me in every way. It was so good!


28096541Three misfits come together to avenge the rape of a fellow classmate and in the process trigger a change in the misogynist culture at their high school transforming the lives of everyone around them in this searing and timely story.

Who are the Nowhere Girls?

They’re everygirl. But they start with just three:

Grace Salter is the new girl in town, whose family was run out of their former community after her southern Baptist preacher mom turned into a radical liberal after falling off a horse and bumping her head.

Rosina Suarez is the queer punk girl in a conservative Mexican immigrant family, who dreams of a life playing music instead of babysitting her gaggle of cousins and waitressing at her uncle’s restaurant.

Erin Delillo is obsessed with two things: marine biology and Star Trek: The Next Generation, but they aren’t enough to distract her from her suspicion that she may in fact be an android.

When Grace learns that Lucy Moynihan, the former occupant of her new home, was run out of town for having accused the popular guys at school of gang rape, she’s incensed that Lucy never had justice. For their own personal reasons, Rosina and Erin feel equally deeply about Lucy’s tragedy, so they form an anonymous group of girls at Prescott High to resist the sexist culture at their school, which includes boycotting sex of any kind with the male students.

Told in alternating perspectives, this groundbreaking novel is an indictment of rape culture and explores with bold honesty the deepest questions about teen girls and sexuality. Continue reading “Review: The Nowhere Girls | A must-read for every girl (and boy)”

4 Female Fictional Role Models and Life Lessons they Taught me.

It is Day of the Girl, so I thought it was a perfect opportunity to tell you about which female characters inspire me to be the kind of person I am today. I was actually planning on posting this yesterday, but I wasn’t feeling 100% and then I found out this morning it was Day of the Girl, so I think it was fate 😛


Lottie Thomas


Gerelateerde afbeelding
I’m so disappointed by the lack of Spinster’s Club fanart.


Lottie from Holly Bourne’s Spinster’s Club series is the character that actually led me to write this post. She’s a kick-ass feminist, sex-positive romantic, outspoken and super smart.

What she taught me:

You should fight for what’s right, even if it’s hard, but mental health is very important so don’t lose yourself in the process.

Every little action adds up to something much bigger.

Arabella Celestine Idris Jezelia of Morrighan (Lia)


fanart by @lesmissy1 on twitter


Lia from The Kiss of Deception Series by Mary E. Pearson has inspired me ever since I finished The Beauty of Darkness. Not only did I steal her name (hehe), her mentality and individuality inspired me to be a better person.

What she taught me:

Every story has multiple sides and you shouldn’t judge before knowing the full story. Not everything is how it seems.

Trust your gut. Trust yourself.

Hermione Granger



↠{♡roos bosch♡}↞
fanart by punziella on tumblr


Hermione from the Harry Potter series by JK Rowling has inspired girls for years and I’m still a little sad I only got to know her when I was almost an adult. Hermione is smart, determined and wants to do right by everyone.

What she taught me:

Stand up for those who can’t stand up for themselves.

Be unconditionally you, don’t ever diminish your intelligence because other’s don’t appreciate it.

Reading is cool.

Fa Mulan


Mulan. Also a good drawing reference for someone holding a sword
fanart by ?? I can’t find the original artist.


Mulan from the movie with the same name is one of the strongest female Disney characters I’ve yet encountered. She is strong, won’t give up and is willing to sacrifice so much for her family.

Girls. Kick. Ass.

You don’t have to be strong to win, being smart is key.


Which characters are your inspiration and why? What life lessons have you learned through fiction? Happy Day of the Girl!